Sugar Addiction: Why Am I Constantly Craving Sweets?

Sugar Addiction: Why Am I Constantly Craving Sweets?

Do you constantly crave sweets? Do you try to avoid sugar, but eventually binge? Do you wonder if you have a sugar addiction? We are constantly bombarded with conflicting nutrition messages; “Eat only foods that are fat-free or low-fat,” “Consume high fat food and lots of protein,” “Avoid all carbohydrates,” “Everyone should follow a Paleo diet,” etc. Let’s step away from the fad diet band wagon for a moment, and consider why it’s important to consume all nutrients in moderation – including carbohydrates. Foods containing carbohydrates are broken down to glucose in your body, which is the key nutrient. Examples of a few carbohydrate-rich sources are foods containing sugar like desserts or candy – as well as bread, rice, grains, lentils, potatoes, pasta, juice and fruit. Carbohydrates are an important energy source for your body, which you likely are aware of already. Not only are they important to provide energy for your body but they also provide fuel for your brain to function. Glucose is the only nutrient that can cross into your brain to be used as fuel to allow you to concentrate and think clearly. What is often not talked about is how important carbohydrates are for the production of making the messenger’s in your brain, specifically serotonin, which is responsible for functions such as making you feel happy and relaxed, as well as helping you sleep, regulate your blood pressure properly, have pain sensitivity and control your mood. Have you put carbohydrates into a “bad food” category? Especially sugar – have you told yourself that you should never eat sugar, because you have a “sugar addiction”?...
DBT Group Denver: Eating Disorders Prevention

DBT Group Denver: Eating Disorders Prevention

DBT Group Denver: Using DBT Skills to Help Prevent Disordered Eating Behavior Have you been wanting to change your relationship with food, but feel stuck or hopeless? In honor of National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, I wanted to assist people to find more freedom in their relationship with food by using simple DBT (Dialectal Behavior Therapy) skills. Many people cope with stress and difficulties in life by turning to food as a coping mechanism. Some people may do this by binge eating, purging, or restricting foods. Many people engage in emotional eating as a way to numb their feelings, be able to feel something else instead of emotional pain or as a way to punish themselves. Does this help you get to a place in which you feel happy? Maybe for a few minutes tops. Then it becomes a dark and lonely place, most often worse off than when you started. Instead of suffering, choose compassion for yourself by using DBT Skills, an easy way to take care of your body, mind and emotions! The first two components of DBT are Distress Tolerance and Mindfulness. Distress Tolerance is as simple as it sounds – finding new ways to tolerate stress that are healthy and safe – not detrimental to your physical and emotional health. Instead of turning towards or away from food to cope with life stressors pick an area in which to distract yourself. Here are a few ways to do this. First, distract yourself with a pleasurable activity. Below are a few suggestions: Go for a walk Go to a movie Read a new juicy book Do online...
Eating Disorders and Body Image: The Body Project

Eating Disorders and Body Image: The Body Project

Do you wish you could lose 5, 10, 20 or more pounds? Do you feel unhappy with your looks, no matter how thin you become? Do you use eating disorder behaviors (meal skipping, purging) as a quest for thinness? If you answered “YES” to any of the above questions, then The Body Project can help. The Body Project workshop, which is a described as a “dissonance-based body-acceptance program is designed to help high school girls and college-age women resist cultural pressures to conform to the thin-ideal standard of female beauty and reduce their pursuit of unhealthy thinness. The Body Project is supported by more research than any other body image program and has been found to reduce onset of eating disorders.” At Positive Pathways, two of our therapists are trained to deliver The Body Project workshop. Our therapists are available to provide this workshop at schools in the Denver area – at no charge! In addition, our therapists can provide the concepts form The Body Project on a 1-on-1 basis as part of individual therapy, to help heal eating disorders and body image issues. Why is a workshop like The Body Project necessary? While the average American woman is 5’4 tall and weighs 140 pounds, the average American model is 5’11 and weighs 117 pounds. In 1995, before television was first introduced to Fiji there were no cases of eating disorder. Sixty-five adolescent schoolgirls were followed over three years and after the introduction of British and American television, 12.7% of the girls had developed high eating disorder after one month and 29.2% after three years. Self-induced vomiting as weigh control went...
Healthy Weight Loss Tips

Healthy Weight Loss Tips

It’s the New Year — are you like an estimated 100 million Americans who set a resolution to lose weight? And are you like an estimated 95% of dieters who will regain any weight they may lose? Most attempts to lose weight actually make weight problems worse — leading to obesity or triggering eating disorders. Is it possible to lose weight in a healthy way? Yes! My name is Dr. Dorie McCubbrey, MSEd, PhD, LPC — Owner and Clinical Director of Positive Pathways — and I’d like to share my Healthy Weight loss Tips with you. As an Eating Disorder and Obesity Treatment Expert with more than 20 years of clinical experience, I’d like to share some strategies which have helped my clients with healthy weight loss, while preventing eating disorder behaviors and rebound weight gain. I also know what it’s like to struggle with Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating Disorder, Food Addiction and Obesity — and these are the tips which help me to live free of eating disorders and maintain a healthy weight. 1. Lose Your Weight Loss Goal. That’s right — to lose weight (and keep it off), you’ve got to stop trying to lose weight! Pause to reflect about how your previous attempts at weight loss have worked for you. Did you lose weight? How quickly, and how much? How did you feel? Did you regain the weight you lost? How quickly, and how much? How did you feel? Pause to notice how your mood changes when the number on the scale changes. Even if you achieve your “goal weight,” you probably don’t feel good, because then you worry about how you’ll keep the...